Facts You May Not Know About Conversion Therapy: A Note from the BOY ERASED Team

One of Boy Erased’s primary goals is to spread awareness of conversion therapy so that no household in America remains ignorant of the fact that over 700,000 Americans have been subjected to conversion therapy and over 20,000 Americans are currently affected by this abusive practice. We have teamed up with the Trevor Project, GLAAD, The National Center for Lesbian Rights, HRC, PFLAG, The Mattachine Society of Washington, D.C., and several other leading LGBTQ+ groups to help spread this message.

But we also want to share even more important message, especially in light of the current administration’s proposed idea of limiting gender classifications and therefore of erasing trans lives: that “trans people are twice as likely as LGB people to be subjected to conversion therapy, which substantially increases the risk for suicide” (Trans Lifeline).

In the past few weeks, both the Trevor Project and Trans Lifeline have received four times the normal call rate, with a significant increase in new calls. As we celebrate Boy Erased, “we also need to redouble our efforts to fight for the most vulnerable members of the community it portrays” (Trans Lifeline).  

So please, as you discuss conversion therapy and Boy Erased, remember to elevate the discussion to include trans lives, and the lives of POC, undocumented people, and people living with disabilities who have also been affected by conversion therapy. And remember that you don’t have to be in a facility or a camp to undergo conversion therapy. With the administration’s most recent plan to “legally erase trans people and deny them civil rights” (Trans Lifeline), we are experiencing conversion therapy on a national scale.         `

You can donate to support trans lives today by:

·      Donating to TransLifeline

·      Following Translifeline on Twitter and Instagram

RSVP for National Arts Club Event

I'll be speaking at the National Arts Club Feb. 7, 8 PM with Maud Newton. We'll be talking about inherited guilt, messy genealogies, and the complicated South. I'll even throw in a slideshow. The event is open to the public. RSVP now

LA Review of Books Profile

“Along their separate journeys, Greenwell and Conley crossed paths in the Balkans, and the two writers stayed in touch. The Gay Invasion was not intended as a pride parade through bookstores by promising new gay writers whose works have been praised for their lush, poetic prose, as well as their compassionate portrayals of the complexities that accompany the ongoing task of reconciling one’s queer identity within a conservative climate. The tour was, in fact, an extension of their bonded mission of LGBT youth activism. Having both taught in high schools, Greenwell and Conley said they continually encountered the same kind of shaming among their students that they had experienced in their own childhoods."